Want to Change the World? Get Off Your Couch and Vote!

There is an old saying that you get what you pay for.  In the world of politics, that might better be said as you get the candidate that someone else has paid for.  But it need not be that way.  Setting aside for a moment the issues of election fraud and voter suppression that have mired this campaign season in the mud, it remains the case that we can have the candidate for whom the majority of us vote.  What is very important to understand is just how few of us act to make that decision.

Most Americans who pay attention to the political world already know that our electorate has a certain notoriety for not showing up to actually vote.  In our best general election tallies, barely 57% of registered voters actually make it to the polls.  In the primaries, you can cut that percentage in half.

This campaign season, much of the talk in the main stream media has focused on the record turnouts on both sides of the political aisle.  Coupled with images from Arizona, Massachusetts and Michigan of long lines queuing up to polling stations, the concerned viewer might think that the political revolution of 2016 is at long last drawing vast numbers of Americans into the political process.  Not so.  Thus far, and calculated on a state by state basis, the Republican primaries have drawn out 17.3% of all eligible voters and the Democratic primaries 11.7%.  Combined then, only 29% of eligible voters from the states which have already held their primary polling have actually made it out to vote.  By extension, by the time that we get around to the general election in November, less than one third of our eligible voters will have determined the candidates between whom all of us have to choose.

And this is a record year for voting!   The Republicans’ 17.3% represents their highest total since 1980 and the Democrats’ 11.7% their highest since 1992.  When many of us ask, rhetorically, “Is this the best we can do?,” the answer is certainly “yes,” if we rely on a small portion of the electorate to get out and do the dirty work of voting. 

When we look at a candidate like Donald Trump, who is seemingly running away with the Republican nomination, he is doing so (presently) with about 34% of the 17.3% who actually come out to vote.  In other words, Trump has roughly 6% of the population of eligible voters behind him and he is very likely to become the Republican nominee. 

Is this an aberration of some sort?  No.  In 2012, Mitt Romney won 30 states, the District of Columbia and the Republican nomination with a combined total of only 9.8 million votes.  That number represented a turnout of just 5.1% of the eligible voters during that cycle’s primaries.

Why do so many people let so few determine whom our leaders will be?  The short answer must encompass laziness and disinterest on the part of the voter.  But equally significant as a cause of poor voter turnout is voter suppression.  The small turnouts in our primary seasons are nothing new.  So, the question becomes, how do I win with a small amount of voter support?  The answer, simply enough, is to do all that you can to maximize your voters while discouraging your opponents’ voters from taking part in the process. 

In this cycle, it appears that the Clinton campaign, in collusion with the DNC, has done a far better job of getting their own vote out (often through early voting mail-in programs), while making it harder for Senator Sanders and Governor O’Malley to maximize their own voters.  The dramatically reduced number of polling stations in Maricopa County, voters who were mysteriously re-registered as Republicans or Independents, a bomb threat to the hotline headquarters for voter issues, letters directing Washington voters to the wrong caucus sites, running out of ballots in Florida by noon time, all of these are examples of ways in which the vote was overtly suppressed. 

More insidious perhaps is the suppression of the vote by the main stream media.  Between endlessly proclaiming the Clinton campaign to be farther ahead in delegates than they actually are and calling the vote in Arizona with only 1% of it in, the media created a reason for people who had been standing in line for five hours to just pack it in and go home.  These are textbook examples of a carefully coordinated voter suppression program.  Interestingly enough, every instance of voter suppression and election fraud has served to help the same candidate.  Coincidence?

But here you are, frustrated and longing to do your civic duty. You should be.  While we can argue all day that the process of voting should be simple, fair and available to all eligible Americans, it is not going to be, so long as the people calling the shots remain the people calling the shots.  It is incumbent upon all of us to work harder to exercise our right to vote, so that those who would suppress our vote have to work that much harder themselves.  Right now, we are making it far too easy for monied interests and national committees to rig the election. 

What should you do? 

First, ignore the hype from the media and the national committees.  The media is owned by corporations which share a hip pocket with the Super Pacs of the front runners and the committees themselves.  They are nothing more than mouthpieces for whomever pays them the most money.  They are mercenaries or, less politely, whores.  The purpose of the media is to disseminate misinformation in a coordinated effort to maintain the establishment by suppressing grass roots efforts to effect change.

Second, ignore the polls.  The vast majority of polling in the United States is done by telephone and the costs to do so are kept down through the use of predictive dialers and robo-callers.  The problem is that it is illegal under FCC statutes to use a predictive dialer or a robotic calling device to call a cellular phone.  That must still be done by hand, in a costly and time-consuming fashion.  Therefore, well in excess of 90% of telephone polling is done exclusively to land lines and some 40% of our population no longer has a land line to call.  That same 40% is also reflective of a younger demographic, so the polls tend to be skewed toward older voters.

Third, research the facts about the candidates.  It is easier than you might think.  Remember, campaign rhetoric is just that.  It is a lot of sturm und drang, vague promises and idle threats.  What the candidates promise is infinitely less significant than what they produce.  Go to your browser and search for a candidate’s name and legislative record.  This will show you just what legislation that candidate has actually authored (sponsored) and what legislation of theirs has been passed into law.  The latter is significant as it tends to show the candidate’s ability to work across the aisle, essential to getting anything done in Washington.

Fourth, make sure you are properly registered.  Try doing a search online for your county and state and voter registration.  From there, you should be able to determine just how you are registered in the eyes of your state.  There have been far too many instances of voter suppression by reassigning registration to the wrong party or to an Independent status in states which do not allow Independents to vote in primaries.  Check that too!  If you are an Independent, change your registration to reflect the party of the candidate you prefer, so that you can be sure to be able to vote in your state’s primary.

It might look like more work, but if you ignore the hype and ignore the polls, you will find that you have more time to research the candidates and check on your registration.

Lastly, get out to vote.  Make the time and you can make the difference.  Do not let anyone convince you that your vote does not count.  When the turnout is so low, each vote carries that much more weight.  When John F. Kennedy defeated Richard Nixon for the presidency in 1960, he did so because he won the state of Illinois.  And he won the state of Illinois by less than 9000 votes.  Your vote matters.  Your vote could change the world.

Remember, the squeaky wheel gets the grease.  Voter suppression tactics are about shutting people up and shutting them out.  Exercise your right.  Vote.  Your voice will be heard, loud and clear.

On the 2016 Primary voting:

http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/03/08/so-far-turnout-in-this-years-primaries-rivals-2008-record/

On the JFK election:

http://stonezone.com/article.php?id=391

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Are We Willing to Pay the Price for Our Freedom?

As the election process inches forward, we are once again faced with allegations of election fraud and voter suppression.  The primary yesterday in Arizona was an outright disgrace.  A state in which one county (Maricopa) had witnessed 300,000 people come out to vote at 200 polling stations during the 2008 election cycle, was unprepared to handle the estimated 800,000 who came out yesterday to only 60 polling stations.  Voters stood for five and six hours on line, only to find that once again, insufficient numbers of ballots were on hand.  Once again, registered voters found that their political affiliation had mysteriously changed or that they had been dropped from voter rolls altogether.  Once again, provisional ballots were handed out though it was indicated to voters that these ballots would not be counted.  And the Media called the election by 10:00p.m. eastern time, with just 1% of the vote in,  while voters were still lined up for blocks at 1:30a.m.

These are the same problems which plagued the primaries in Florida (where some thirteen precincts had run out of ballots by noon), North Carolina, Illinois, Ohio, Utah, Idaho, Missouri, Massachusetts, and just about every state the Clinton campaign has notched as a victory.  Oddly enough, a large proportion of Hillary’s supporters have been instructed to vote early, by mail, and avoid the entire precinct voting process.

But there have been instances of Republican election rigging as well, namely Ted Cruz’s efforts to convince voters in Iowa that Ben Carson was dropping out of the race.  Yesterday, in Mormon Utah, a Super Pac supporting Ted Cruz ran an ad featuring a nude Melania Trump with the tag-line, “Meet Melania Trump, your next First Lady.  Or, you could support Ted Cruz on Tuesday.”  I have absolutely no love for Donald Trump, but attacking someone’s family in this manner is gutless, classless, despicable and cowardly.  And whether or not it was authorized by him, Ted Cruz will have to own that characterization from here on out.

One interesting element to the dirty politics we are seeing from both sides, is that it has originated with the establishment candidates.  Neither Sanders’ nor Trump’s campaigns have been accused of attempting to rig the elections.  The DNC, on the other hand, has been complicit in nearly every effort to suppress the vote of Democrats who would largely be supporting Bernie Sanders (if Hillary’s supporters have voted early and in enough numbers, you could suppress everyone on election day and almost guarantee a win for the Clintons).  The RNC has openly suggested that they might need to run a third party candidate to stop Trump, and has dragged Mitt Romney out of mothballs to do their dirty work.

How should we read this?  To express the conditions surrounding our current election process in their simplest terms, the Establishment on both sides is actively working to suppress the will of the people to make a change in the status quo of our government.  The Establishment is utterly out of touch with the voters of this country.  When Trump and Sanders began their campaigns, each was scoffed at by their respective party elders.  Each was seen as something of a joke.  But Sanders and Trump are engaged with their base; they know their supporters.  Each, for his own reasons, reflects the will of the voting makeup of his party.  And now, the Establishment finds itself with only one card left to play; make sure that those votes don’t count.

Like him or not, Donald Trump is bringing voters out of the woodwork.  His rallies are enormous and his supporters passionate (for all of the wrong reasons, I would add).  The other night, Sanders held a rally in Washington State which drew 35,000 people.  Hillary, meanwhile, held her “rally” in a living room where attendees paid $27,000 apiece to get in and $50,000 if they wanted to meet and speak with her.  This is not lost on the American voting public.

Middle and working class people in America may not really be able to comprehend just how much money $170 billion dollars in increased earnings by the top fifteen people in America is, but we know when we are getting screwed.  We know that when Washington tells us the economy is improving, it isn’t improving for us.  Our wallets are still just as empty.  Our credit cards still carry large balances.  Our bank accounts still have no buffer.  Our jobs pay less, our health care costs more.  Our retirement savings won’t be enough and a trip to the hospital could be one cost too much.  We may be able to remember a past full of promise, but we now fear that our children will have no future.

“At least,” we may have thought, “we still have a voice.”  We have been taught since we first entered school that the greatness of America lies in the process by which we, the people, elect representatives to speak on our behalf in Washington and in the State Assemblies. Each November, we learned, the people get to vote so that the government represents our needs, our desires and our principles.   That, we now must concede, was a lie. 

The middle and working class people of this country did not arrive here overnight.  We can now look back on nearly half a century of legislation which has allowed corporate America to line its pockets while sending our jobs and our futures overseas, legislation that keeps us in debt to big health care corporations when the rest of the industrialized world provides better health care as a right to its people.  We have been dragged into twenty odd years of endless and pointless war, run up a national debt that is somewhere in the vicinity of nineteen trillion dollars, and found that a large chunk of the debt for which we are responsible, is held by the Chinese.  The people on both sides of the aisle, playing politics in Washington, have doomed at least once generation of us to penury.  And now, the RNC and the DNC have informed us that we no longer even have a voice of complaint in the process.  Our votes, if it looks like they will cause injury to the Establishment, don’t count.

In the title of this article, the question was asked, “Are we willing to pay the price for our freedom?”  We often hear that our nation’s soldiers have paid that price for us, guaranteeing with their lives the freedoms which we enjoy.  But now we have to ask whether we are free at all.  One need not feel the bars to be trapped in a cage.  When limitations are placed on our abilities to grow as a society or as individuals within it, we are not free.  When a corrupt economic system keeps the vast majority of us enslaved to the next paycheck, we are not free.  And when our political leadership looks us in the eye and says that our voices do not matter, we are not free.

It is now nearly forty eight years since the summer of 1968, two generations, a single life lived almost to its mid-line.  It was in 1968 that the people, for one brief, shining moment, found their voice.  The assassination of JFK in 1963 marked the first time that the majority of American people believed that their own government could not be trusted.  By 1968, with the war raging in southeast Asia and middle and working class American kids being drafted and sent to fight for nothing more than the nightly body count, that voice rose as one to shout down the Establishment. 

While the respective parties gave us establishment candidates in the form of Richard Nixon and Hubert Humphrey, the grass roots gave rise to Eugene McCarthy and, later in the campaign, Robert Kennedy.  McCarthy’s early primary lead chased incumbent president Lyndon Johnson out of the race and lured RFK in.  In time, the voice of the young people in America, desperate to end the war and to heal the wounds at home between white and black Americans, coalesced behind RFK.  McCarthy’s ill advised remarks on opting for a Communist coalition in Vietnam and relocating black youth out of urban areas to quell urban problems ultimately doomed his campaign. 

So, with the Doors’ song, “Five to One” as a backdrop, the young people of this country began to see that it was true that “they have the guns but we’ve got the numbers.”  And politics, after all, is a numbers game.  Everything was coming together for a political revolution.   And then it was gone.  Civil Rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr. was murdered in Memphis on April 4th and RFK was assassinated in Los Angeles two months later.  By late August and the Democratic convention in Chicago, the sense that the fix was in was palpable.  During the primaries, some 80% of the votes cast were in favor of anti-war candidates, but at the convention, the DNC pushed Hubert Humphrey through, despite the fact that he had not entered a single primary.  The “riots in the streets” to which Donald Trump alluded last week when considering what might happen if he is denied the nomination, were exactly what played out in Chicago.

In hindsight, 1968 saw this country on the verge of a massive political shift, away from establishment politics, away from a war that no one outside of government wanted, away from hatred and divisiveness at home.  The chance was there and the voting public seemed ready to seize it.  But the promise went unfulfilled.  Now, nearly half a century later, the chance has once again arisen.  This time. however, it is not a “lone nut gun-man” who has his crosshairs on our opportunity.  It is the establishment itself, bold as brass.

Perhaps it takes a leader like RFK or maybe Bernie Sanders, to galvanize the people of our republic behind an image of all that is good about us, an image of the potential for greatness that still lies in America.  Or, could it be that Donald Trump has revealed something about ourselves that we have kept hidden, but which could once again push us to the top of the world stage?  Truly, those leaders come along only once in a lifetime.  So the question is reframed, “Are we willing to pay the price for our freedom to elect the leadership we choose for ourselves?”  If the people put their support behind a candidate whom the parties seek to undo, are we willing to destroy the parties in return?

This journal does not endorse Donald Trump.  Other articles here have in no uncertain terms pointed out just how bad a choice he would be for the country.  But if Hillary Clinton is to get the nomination, are we, the people, willing to pay the price of electing her and continuing the ownership of this country by the ruling class?  If the supporters of Bernie Sanders “sit on their hands” in protest, refusing to vote for a candidate who is the antithesis of all that they believe, Trump will win, regardless of what the Republican party does to stop him.  The next four years will be disastrous, for trade, for human rights, for maintaining allegiances throughout the world.  But should we elect Clinton, the very first order of business for the DNC will be to make sure that no grass roots candidate ever again threatens the party’s plan.  The next Bernie Sanders, maybe fifty years from now, will have it that much harder.

Do we resign ourselves to business as usual or do we break the machine and build anew?

Those who do not learn from history are condemned to repeat it.  George Carlin used to say about the relationship between the working people of this country and the owners of the country (and of our government) that, “it is a big club and you and I ain’t in it.”  The old Fram Oil Filter ad warned us that, “you can pay me now or pay me later.”  If we don’t stop the cycle of selling our freedom now, we consign our children and our grandchildren to the debtor’s prison of paying later.  Thirty pieces of silver now could damn us for generations to come.  I, for one, am not willing to pay that price.

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Are Voters Crashing the Party?

Follow the link below for a telling series of comments from DNC Super Delegate Howard Dean and from DNC Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz on the process by which the Super Delegates cast their votes in the Democratic Primary. 

When challenged on his decision to cast his Super Delegate vote for Hillary Clinton in the wake of Vermont voters selecting Bernie Sanders by an 86 to 13 percent majority, Dean responded that, “Super delegates don’t “represent people” I’m not elected by anyone. I’ll do what I think is right for the country.”

Similarly, DNC Chair Schultz (an ardent Clinton supporter) has explained the role of Super Delegates as a means by which the Democratic Party is protected from grass roots candidates, you know, the ones the people actually get behind.  Far be it from the Party to allow actual voters to crash the process.

“Unpledged delegates exist really to make sure that party leaders and elected officials don’t have to be in a position where they are running against grassroots activists. We are as a Democratic Party really highlight and emphasize inclusiveness and diversity at our convention, and so we want to give every opportunity to grassroots activists and diverse, committed Democrats to be able to participate, attend, and be a delegate at the convention. And so we separate out those unpledged delegates to make sure that there isn’t competition between them.” – DNC Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz

More Washingtonian Double Speak.  There should be a Rosetta Stone guide to this language.  The gist of it is that the Party wants the grassroots movements, the ones that could change the direction of the party and possibly bring it into the twenty first century, to be represented like a fly in amber, but then conveniently shelved in time to name the candidate the party wanted all along.  Is the primary process just for show?  The implication is that the Party exists as a philosophical plaything of a small group of elite social planners, and that the expressed will of the citizens of this country is understood more as a hindrance to their planning than as a validation of it.

Since his campaign for President began, Bernie Sanders has reminded us that the system is rigged.  I can imagine him now, in his thickest New York accent, bending one arm upward at the elbow and shouting, “You want your rigged system?!  I got it right here!”

Once again, we are witness to an election cycle where contests are exceedingly close. This year, the opposition candidate, frontrunner Donald Trump, is bringing voters out of the woodwork like never before.  And yet, the party elders of the Democratic Party  do not see any real need to support the will of their own base.  After all, they know better than the voter what is good for the country (at least in terms of lobbyist funding for Democratic Super Pacs).  It may surprise them in November to find that the voters think otherwise.

It is very interesting to note that on both sides of the hedge, Republican and Democrat, the party leaders still fail to grasp just how disgusted with party politics the voters have become.  The grassroots movement to which they refer is spreading everywhere, on both sides of the fence.  On that first Tuesday in November, the party faithful may show up for the victory rally and wonder where the party went.

For us, the voters, it is one more example of the reasons we need to vote our conscience and disregard the media pundits, the Super Pac advertising blitzes and the proclamations from the parties, themselves.  If this country is ever to return from oligarchy to one in which the voice of the people resonates in Washington, it will be on our backs and on our votes.

Disregard the rhetoric.  Look at the records.  Decide for yourself whom this government should represent.  Do not let anyone convince you to stay home because the decision has already been reached.  Your vote matters.  Vote your conscience.

http://ivn.us/2016/03/08/former-dnc-chair-superdelegates-dont-represent-the-people-theyll-do-what-they-want/

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